Inspiration : Nurturing

This is a series of inspiring stories of women being women. To find more stories, click on the Inspiration page tab above.

Cecile Pelous

Cecile Pelous

Cecile Pelous grew up in a large family just outside of Paris.  She was the only girl surrounded by eight brothers, in a small French apartment.  She now works as a fashion designer for Christian Dior, hanging out with Elizabeth Taylor and Gwen Stefani.  But that is by far not the coolest part of her life.   As she was moving along professionally, she began to feel like she wanted to do more–be out in the world and serve.  She has no biological children of her own, and I don’t believe that she is married.  So, free of familial responsibilities, she went to Calcutta to help Mother Teresa and worked with the lepers and delivered medicine in the streets.  From there, she went to Nepal and was so overwhelmed by the suffering of the children she met that she determined to do something,  so she sold her house.  She flew back to Nepal and built an orphanage with the money.  The orphanage is now home to her 79 Nepalese children.  30 are now grown and financially self-reliant and she joyfully visits twice a year.  She wanted to make people happy, notably, at the expense of her own comfort. Her mormon.org profile video is amazing.
Cecile embodies the trait of nurturing.  Mothers nurture by default–they have to feed and clothe and teach the children underfoot.  But women are nurturers by nature too, and when the opportunity wasn’t right in front of Cecile, she went out and found it.  And because she wasn’t encumbered by her own family, she was able to be a mother to a group of children who badly needed her. I’ve seen women suppress this trait when they don’t have children of their own, and then become bitter when ever anyone talks about Motherhood as a corollary to the Priesthood.  I love this example of embracing the nurturer within and finding a way to be a mother to children who desperately need one.
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